2015 Conference abstracts


The abstracts of the upcoming conference and details on the authors can be found below, the full conference schedule is available here.

 

Abstracts


Alternative Paints for External Timber (APET):Evaluation of the Exterior Durability of Decorative Exterior Coatings in Accordance with BS EN 927 Part 3

Peter Collins

Abstract:

This talk presents the findings to date of an exterior durability trial of a range of traditional and modern exterior coatings for wood. The performance of the paint is being assessed in accordance with BS EN 927 – Part 3: 2006, whereby test paints are applied in quadruplicate onto flat panels prepared from carefully controlled scots pine (pinus sylvestris) sapwood. A set of panels was also prepared by coating with a so called internal comparison product; used to assess the severity of the exposure site. After application three of the panels were exposed on metal racks facing due south at an angle of elevation of 45o to the horizontal; and one set of panels was retained internally as a reference comparison. The panels have been exposed for 36 months so far and currently are being exposed for a further 12 months, after which they will be assessed, photographed and reported on again.

The panels were monitored and assessed for a range of properties including: blistering, flaking, cracking, mould growth, chalking and general appearance. Panels were then washed and assessed for: colour, gloss, mould growth, adhesion and general appearance. Finally panels were photographed for inclusion of images in the reports.

Significant differences in performance were notable between the various products evaluated, whilst in most cases little variation was noticeable between replicates, which provides good confidence in the testing methodology.

Peter Collins

About the Author:

Peter Collins  studied Chemistry at Loughborough University, before joining ICI Paints in 1978.  His career at ICI included roles in polymer manufacturing and decorative coatings R&D, specialising in coatings for exterior wood.  His last appointment at ICI was as UK Manufacturing Excellence Manager with responsibility for product quality and process improvement. In 2004 he joined Sonneborn and Rieck Ltd as Technical Manager, responsible for R&D over a wide range of Industrial Coatings technologies including: acrylics, alkyds, epoxies, polyurethanes, powder coatings and uv cured coatings. In 2008 he was appointed as Technical Director of the Paint Research Association (PRA), where he was responsible for all aspects of coatings research and technical services.

Since August 2015, he has continued to work with PRA as an associate consultant, whilst running his own independent consultancy practice: Peter Collins Coatings Consultancy Ltd

 


BS 7913 for guiding and controlling best practice

John Edwards

Abstract:

An introduction and description of the most authoritative UK wide guidance on building conservation by its lead author. Highlighting issues concerning decorative surfaces and providing examples where BS 7913 can guide and also control in order to deliver best practice.

John Edwards

About the Author:

Until April 2014 John held one of the UK’s most senior building conservation positions as Assistant Director of Cadw, the Welsh Governments historic environment service. Here John was responsible for the management and conservation of 129 historic sites in state care including ICOMOS World Heritage Sites at five locations. Prior to Cadw John worked for English Heritage. John is now a Director of Edwards Hart a multi-disciplined consultancy practice where John leads on building conservation. John has also contributed to the development of standards and best practice guidance which ranges from BS 7913: 2013: Guide to the conservation of historic buildings as lead author to the National Occupational Standards in Conservation Control.

 


Paintwork and Planning: A conservation officer’s view

Matthew Pendleton

Abstract:

Matthew will be talking about his local planning authority experience with reference to historic colour schemes in listed buildings, the need (or otherwise) for listed building consent, and the prosecution for unauthorized internal redecoration at No.3 Savile Row.

unnamed (2)

About the Author:

Matthew is a chartered architect working for Westminster City Council as an Area Design and Conservation Officer. He has worked at English Heritage as a Historic Buildings and Areas Advisor in the London Region, and in private practice in the building conservation and traditional new-build sectors. He has given expert evidence in court and at Public Inquiries and has worked on, amongst other things, the restoration, alteration and new-build of country houses and London and provincial town houses for private clients and organisations such as the National Trust, Landmark Trust, and the Duchy of Cornwall.

 


Dream coats for historic metalwork [working title]

Brian Hall

Abstract:

Conservators are often asked to provide advice on appropriate coatings for Historic Ironwork. This is an especially difficult task for external objects where maintenance budgets or access can be restricted.

There is a huge range of products on the market many claiming to last up to 20 years. With so much choice how are conservators to know what is the right choice for their particular project? In our experience, coatings are often specified without a full assessment being undertaken as to how the object will be used or interacted with by staff or members of the public. With so many factors to take into consideration, it’s no wonder so many of these Dream Coats fail!

This talk will focus on various paint types and other coatings, along with appropriate testing methods. The Tijou Screen and other external projects will be used as a practical example of the pros and cons of some of these options.

Brian Hall

About the author:

Brian Hall; is an Accredited Conservator-Restorer, specialising in the conservation and restoration of Sculpture and both fine and architectural metalwork.

His career began in 1987 when he joined Naylor Conservation as an apprentice training with Andrew and Janet Naylor, focusing on the conservation of public monuments and sculpture.

In 1990-92 he attended Hereford College of Technology on the blacksmithing, restoration and allied trades course. In 1993 he joined Plowden & Smith Ltd, London, and was employed as a metals conservator responsible for large metalwork projects and sculpture. Since 1997 he has worked as a freelance conservator, restorer and consultant, taking on many large projects and in 2008 formed Hall Conservation Ltd.

Brian is also a Director and Council Member of the National Heritage Ironwork Group (N.H.I.G), a charity set up in 2009. NHIG is dedicated to the safeguarding and preservation of wrought ironwork through promoting high standards of workmanship, conservation and repair through research and education.

 


Recreating the finishes at Palace of Westminster

Amanda White & Lucy Kaszewska

Abstract:

The Strangers Dining Room, located on the principle floor of the Palace of Westminster overlooking the Thames, is considered one of the most significant spaces within the Palace to dine, where MPs can take their invited guests.  During the summer recess of 2014, the room underwent a major program of conservation and restoration, which included the recreation of the AWN Pugin stencilled ceiling that had been overpainted in the 1950s.  This talk will look at the background to the project, including discussing the paint research and trials undertaken to determine the feasibility of large scale uncovering of the decoration, which informed the decision to recreate rather than uncover and restore.  The reasons for choosing zinc oil paints for the recreation will be examined in the context of the conservation principles of the Parliamentary Estate, compatibility, sustainability and aesthetics, and the characteristics and history of zinc oil paint will also be touched on.  Finally we will look at the paint trials and test panels produced for agreement of finish and colour with the Project Team, followed by looking at the works themselves.

Lucy Kaszewska  Amanda White_small

About the Authors:

With a background in Fine Art, Amanda returned to education to undertake her post graduate training in the Conservation of Historic Objects at the University of Lincoln (MA, PGDip). Following graduation in 2007
she worked as a project conservator for Sharjah Museums Department and National Museums Northern Ireland as well as a freelance conservator in the private sector, specializing in painted and gilded decoration.  Since 2010 she has worked as a conservator and project manager for Hirst Conservation and in 2014 she led the team restoring the Strangers’ Dining Room, Palace of Westminster, which included the recreation of the Pugin stencilled ceiling decoration.

Lucy started working for Hirst Conservation in 2008, following graduation from the Conservation of Paintings and Polychrome Sculpture (MA equivalent), at the Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun, Poland. Undertaking and supervising numerous projects within historic interiors, she developed new skills and gradually switched her main area of interest from easel paintings towards the conservation and restoration of decorative schemes, composition of traditional painting materials and ethical approaches to the recreation of historic decoration. As a team member for the Strangers’ Dining Room project, she was responsible for the preparation and testing of paints and stencils, and for the provision of trial panels.

 


Art in the making: Egyptian Blue

Elsbeth Geldhof

Abstract:

This paper will discuss the techniques the painters of the ancient world used for making different hues, different textures and patterns, and relief varieties, all in the manmade pigment that was discovered first on an ancient Egyptian object from circa 3200 BCE: Egyptian Blue.

The pigment is often believed to be a reference to the treasured mineral lapis lazuli. However, the glass like pigment could be handled like a paint from glaze layer to opaque substance, could be carved like a stone, or moulded and formed like a clay.

As there are few art technological sources for Egyptian Blue, all the information needs to be found on the actual objects. This presentation will reflect the searching process via material analysis, as well as via the reconstruction of tools (ancient pens and brushes) and polychrome surfaces.

Elsbeth Geldhof

About the author:

Elsbeth Geldhof is an architectural historian and historic paint conservator. She collaborates with building archeologists, conservation scientists and fellow conservators on projects where painted finishes are the central subject, based on Architectural Paint Research Methods. In recent years, she expanded her focus to polychromy, painting techniques and pigment sources of the ancient world. She is now involved in research projects at the University of California at Los Angeles, (UCLA), and at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.


The challenges of recreating murals and polychrome decorative schemes using modern and traditional paints.

Saskia Huning

Abstract:

This paper will look at a number of schemes that have been recreated, using both traditional and modern materials. Examples will be taken from St Nicholas’ Priory, a polychrome decorative scheme on wooden panels, recreated with traditional paints; St. Paul’s Church, Deptford, trompe l’oeil scheme on gold an early 18th century scheme recreated using modern materials; Coade stone lions in Victoria Park, Bath, bronzing using traditional materials; the mural of Synagoga at Crewe Hall, recreated using modern materials. Some examples of 20th Century murals which have been repaired and recreated using modern materials will also be discussed. A retrospective look will be taken at the pros and cons of the chosen materials.

Saskia Huning

About the Author:

Saskia Huning is an artist and specialist decorator working on restoring and recreating historic decorative schemes and murals. Saskia joined the family business Huning Decorations fifteen years ago and since then has developed a great interest in traditional paints and methods.

Working in both traditional and modern materials, Huning Decorations use the following techniques in their work; graining, marbling, gilding, stencilling, murals, trompe l’oeil, glaze effects and decorative painting. Traditional paints are made in their studios for use on the projects. Colour mixing, and the application of the paint in the appropriate way to sit with the handwriting of the original painting being restored or recreated, is particularly important in their work.

Working for the National Trust, English Heritage, and churches and houses around the country, recent projects include recreating the polychrome decoration at the Chinese Pagoda in the water garden at Cliveden, and recreating 20th century murals by Fred Millett at St Crispin’s School in Wokingham, and The Annunciation by Evelyn Gibbs at St Martin’s church in Nottingham. At Crewe Hall the mural of Synagoga, which was originally painted in 1876, has been recreated, the original having been damaged and painted over.